Uncategorized
single-image

Many Second Life T-Shirts Use Socialverse appUnauthorized Copies of Real Life Art, Says Leading Fashionista

If LL got a takedown notice and they’re not acting on it in a timely fashion, hell ya, break out the pitchforks and torches.

If they didn’t get a takedown notice from the rights holder (NOT a third party), then any proactive action on their part exposes them to liability if it turns out that the creator did have the legal right to use the content.

If you don’t own the copyright, a complaint to LL will probably result in no action. All you can do in that situation is find out who owns the rights, notify that party, and let them decide whether they want to file a formal takedown.

Some holders are hardcore about enforcing their rights, some have a legal obligation to enforce their rights or risk losing them altogether (I think trademarks work like that), and some could care less.

The point is, it’s up to the rights holder to enforce their rights, not Linden Labs.

My personal view of using stuff on the internet is: If it’s for your personal use, have fun. But if it’s for sale, you’d better have all your rights secured first. Just like I am in no way infringing when I hit PRINT on a photo on the internet, I don’t see that I’m infringing if I make my own SL Tshirt from something out of the internet either.

The rub comes when you are trying to SELL stuff. Going back to the print again, just because I am allowed to print a pic that’s out in public for my own use, I’m not allowed to print a whole bunch and then sell the books. The former is fair use; the latter is commercial use. And that really is how I think the lines need to be drawn in the whole IP issue, internet and SL and everywhere. (I’ll bet money that these people making mashup songs aren’t getting licenses either.)

If you make your own shirt for yourself, have fun. If you are selling stuff, be legal or be shut down. And if enough people love your $Item and want to buy it, that’s a pretty good gauge of when to get in touch with the original content owner and ask for a limited license to use said image in SL alone.

And of course i despise even more those Tiktok for crypto  who use others content to gain profits!

That’s why i made several reports to LL and 1st to the original creators, of stuff i saw being sold on martketstreet that i knew for sure they where just copy boot itens!

The problem is that even when the original content creator fill a claim, LL will not act most of tiems, at least for a long period!

The blame for selling products with images or logos of real life (eg nike, adidas, etc) within Second Life without paying copyright is of Linden Lab’s fault that does nothing about it.

In Second Life I have seen countless shops selling paintings with images copied (for example, in a store I saw the Mona Lisa, Las Meninas and more famous paintings), and probably the person selling these “paintings” have not paid to the families of these painters.

In other stores I’ve seen brand cars sold (eg, Ferrari, Mercedes, Audi, etc).

I think Linden Lab should do something about it and prevent copyrighted brands are sold in Second Life.

Again, if Linden Lab is not responding to formal DMCA notices in a timely fashion, you’ve got every right to go after them.

If it’s not a formal DMCA takedown notice, don’t expect them to play vigilante. This is a real-world legal question, which makes intervention akin to mediating a war between the sharks and the crocodiles.

 

 

 

You may also like